Halls of GDC: A Tour Of The Crytek Booth

Origin Insider had an all-access pass to the Crytek booth at GDC this week. Read on as we take you behind-the-scenes of their new technology and share stories from the original Crysis. 

Crytek’s GDC booth was front and center at the Moscone Center in San Francisco. The booth had two separate areas for attendees to get their hands on new reveals not yet open to the public.

One of the highlights of the booth was a sneak peek at the new free-to-play game, Warface, currently under development by Crytek and produced by Trion Worlds in North America. Warface uses the power of CryEngine 3.5 to deliver enhanced visual fidelity that brings their game to life like never before; for example real-time reflection and lighting and technology that allows the grass to move in real-time when interacting with the player and environment. 

Warface is still in closed beta, so only a limited number of people have been able to get their hands on it, but Trion Worlds Community Manager Lance James told us it’s “scary” how good and competitive players are becoming already. Warface will be played on GFACE, a new on-line social gaming site, which is also currently in closed beta. To sign up for the Warface beta, visit their website at www.warface.com.   

Origin Insider’s sneak peak continued with a show and tell with 3D Artist Andrew Stifter from Crytek. He demonstrated the technology that makes the water glisten with the reflection of the world around it and the shadows that dance with each flicker of nearby light. Though this is truly revolutionary technology, Stifter is most enthused with the technology that allows for the grass to move with each turn of the wind.  In the demo, he showed soldiers walking through a patch of lush green grass, moving in time with each step of the player. 

Origin Insider also spoke with Crytek Producer Michael Read to talk about the recent launch of Crysis 3. With a heavy PC gamer community, we wanted to know what is next for Crysis games. Read tells us that Crysis was always meant to be a trilogy but, with the Crysis world greatly expanding over the course of the past three games, there is always room to expand the franchise. 

I asked Read to discuss his favorite game moments from Crysis; he went with the fast-paced Crash Site that made its debut in Crysis 2 and returned in Crysis 3. He also went on to tell us about an original design document from 2008 that consisted of 500 pages that was pulled out for nostalgia on the anniversary of the original Crysis. This document was a nod to the old fashioned design documents that have given way to industry standard, high powered decks with quick, to-the-point slides. Read thought it was especially interesting that the document gave no mention to nano suit which has become a big part of the Crysis trilogy. The basic premise was Marines vs. the Chinese, “it was great to see how far the game has evolved since the original document was made”. He also mentioned the female suits that were developed but never used in any of the gameplay. Could these suits be used in the future? We both agreed that it would be great to see it in a future title.